If It Ain’t Broke, Fix It

Story of the Day for Tuesday April 10, 2012

If It Ain’t Broke, Fix It

                  These things happened to them as examples and were written down as warnings for us.
1 Corinthians 10:11

There’s a lot of wisdom in the down-home saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Yet, I read about a castle in Spain that was built on the edge of a 300 foot cliff. To reach the castle, visitors would be strapped into a large wicker basket and pulled up by a rope with a pulley system.

One visitor reached the top and noticed that the rope that pulled him up was badly frayed.

“How often do you install a new rope?”

The attendant nonchalantly replied, “When the old rope breaks.”

Sometimes we need to talk about fixing things that ain’t broke . . . yet.

It’s a sin to walk up to a member of the Hell’s Angels and tell him he’s a snotty-nosed pile of buffalo dung and that his mother dresses him funny. Not many people, however, commit this sin because they receive immediate feedback that maybe it wasn’t such a good idea.

We commit sin because it is a good idea. Or, at least, it seems like it at the time. When I pig out on potato chips or brownies, my life is filled with pleasure and happiness.  There’s no down side . . . until sometime later when I have to suck in my gut to get my pants on. If I blimped out the minute I finished a bag of chips, I would be far more hesitant to do it.  But when the consequences aren’t immediate, somehow, I think my overindulgences are worth the effort.

When Moses went up on the mountain to meet with God, the people got tired of waiting for him to come back down, so they made a golden idol and started dancing and whooping it up – proving that idolatry is lots of fun. At first. Later, when Israel arrived east of the Jordan, the men of Israel indulged in sexual immorality with the Moabite women, who invited them to sacrifice to their pagan god.  And a good time was had by all . . . for the moment. Let’s face it – when we sin, we do so because the pleasure seems, at the moment, to outweigh any negative consequences. And, hey, if it ain’t broke . . .

But Paul uses these incidents of idolatry from Israel’s past to warn us that, even when sin seems like a bargain, it eventually catches up with us.  These tragic examples of Israel’s downfalls are meant as warnings to us that, if it ain’t broke yet, you better fix it anyway, because it is going to break sooner or later.

Jesus didn’t come to pat the “unbroken” on the head and tell them what a good job they did. It’s just as well – he wouldn’t find anyone like that.

He came to heal the brokenhearted, and fit the pieces back together again.
                        (copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)