Tag Archives: anxiety

“How to Fall Off a Cliff”

Story of the Day for Wednesday July 31, 2012 

“How to Fall Off a Cliff”

                    Throw all your worries on God, because he cares about you. 

                                                                            1 Peter 5:7

It was a dark and stormy night.  The man’s candle lantern blew out, and now he made his way in the inky blackness along the dirt road to the nearest farmhouse.

In the darkness he wandered off the road and stumbled over a cliff.  As he fell he grabbed hold of a branch jutting out from the side of the cliff. He shouted for help, but his cries were not answered.  Steadily, his arms began to weaken. When he could no longer hold on, he let out a groan, and fell . . . six inches to the bottom of the ditch.

That man was terrified as he hung from the branch. But his fear was due to lack of knowledge. Had he had known he was only six inches from the ditch he would have no trouble letting go.

That raises an intriguing question: how much of our anxiety is based on a lack of knowledge? If you think about it, just about all our anxiety is based on our lack of knowledge.

“That’s great, Uncle Marty. Unfortunately, I already know my anxiety is based on my lack of knowledge, but I can’t do anything to change it!  I don’t know how the stock market is going to do next week, or how effective the chemo treatments are going to work, or whether Thelma will still like me after I accidentally ran over her cat.”

Maybe this will help. Steve Brown, in a teaching called, Walking Free, talked about those dreaded threats we all remember. His grade school teacher warned the class that, if they didn’t behave, they would be sent to the principal’s office.

The dreaded day arrived when Steve Brown could no longer be good. As he made his way to the principal’s office, he reflected on his life’s end.

When he sat before the principal, he said, “You’re having trouble, aren’t you Stephen?”

“Yeah.”

“You don’t like that teacher very much, do you?”

“Uh . . . no sir, not much.”

And then the principal said, “I don’t either.” They laughed together. And then Stephen realized that all the rumors about the principal were untrue. He wasn’t the stern authority figure that other people said he was.

The principal told Steve, “I want you to come down and meet me in my office, and I’ll get you out before the bus leaves so you can get home on time.”  They became friends.

You don’t have to know God’s plan for your future in order to get rid of anxiety.  All you really need to know is that your Father cares about you.  And that he’s your friend.

(copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)

How All Stories End

Story of the Day for Thursday March 15, 2012

How All Stories End

                      Do not call conspiracy everything these people call conspiracy; do not fear what they fear.

                                                                    Isaiah 8:12

I’m reading a book about the Revolutionary War, and it is not looking good for the Americans.  Congress has declared independence from Great Britain, but now, a little over a month later, the British have arrived in force: 73 warships, and 400 transport ships.  The British are bearing down with the most powerful, well-trained army in the world.  The ragtag Americans are no match for the 32,000 British troops who have just hammered the Colonial troops at the Battle of Brooklyn.

General George Washington is trying to sneak his army off the island at night, but messages get confused.  The wrong regiments are moving at the wrong time and everything is in confusion. At dawn, with much of the army still trying to cross over to New York, they are sitting ducks for British warships and advancing troops.

 

Do you want to know what I think?  I haven’t read to the end of the book, but I don’t think we’re going to win this war.  The Americans don’t have a chance.  The British are going to notice the retreat at first light and destroy our army.  We’re going to be crushed by British military might and end up a British colony forever!   Then they’re going to slap a tax on all imports of Earl Grey tea and we’re going to have to sing “God Save the King” at the beginning of all our football games.

People often comment on my keen foresight about things.  I don’t know, I just seem to be able to look at these kinds of situations and know what’s going to happen.

 

After reading on, I learn that at the last moment – just before dawn – a thick fog settled in over the American troops.  New York is clear, but the fog surrounding our retreat is so thick the British complained they couldn’t see six feet.  Washington ended up evacuating his entire army of 9000 men without the loss of a single life.

Okay, but that was just luck we weren’t destroyed .

Wasn’t it?

 

I have continued reading and my prediction is being vindicated – we are getting clobbered by the British. Sure, Washington escaped to the mainland, but now the British warships have trounced us at Kips Bay. We retreat. They pursue. They have taken Fort Washington and 2000 patriots have been captured.  They attacked Fort Lee and we gave it up without a fight.  A third of the army is sick, and there are only 3500 American soldiers left.  I just know we’re going to lose this war for independence.

 

Jesus teaches us we should not worry about the future.  He is the King of Kings.  All things are under his control.  And even people of keen foresight (like me), need to trust that the Lord alone knows how all stories end.
                                                           (copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)

“How To Fall Off A Cliff”

Story of the Day for Monday August 29, 2011

“How to Fall Off a Cliff” 

                     Throw all your worries on God, because he cares about you. 

                                                             1 Peter 5:7

 It was a dark and stormy night.  The man’s candle lantern blew out, and now he made his way in the inky blackness along the dirt road to the nearest farmhouse.

In the darkness he wandered off the road and stumbled over a cliff.  As he fell he grabbed hold of a branch jutting out from the side of the cliff. He shouted for help, but his cries were not answered.  Steadily, his arms began to weaken. When he could no longer hold on, he let out a groan, and fell . . . six inches to the bottom of the ditch.

 

That man was terrified as he hung from the branch. But his fear was due to lack of knowledge. Had he had known he was only six inches from the ditch he would have no trouble letting go.

That raises an intriguing question: how much of our anxiety is based on a lack of knowledge? If you think about it, just about all our anxiety is based on our lack of knowledge.

 

“That’s great, Uncle Marty. Unfortunately, I already know my anxiety is based on my lack of knowledge, but I can’t do anything to change it!  I don’t know how the stock market is going to do next week, or how effective the chemo treatments are going to work, or whether Thelma will still like me after I accidentally ran over her cat.”

 

Maybe this will help. Steve Brown, in a teaching called, Walking Free, talked about those dreaded threats we all remember. His grade school teacher warned the class that, if they didn’t behave, they would be sent to the principal’s office.

The dreaded day arrived when Steve Brown could no longer be good. As he made his way to the principal’s office, he reflected on his life’s end.

When he sat before the principal, he said, “You’re having trouble, aren’t you Stephen?”

“Yeah.”

“You don’t like that teacher very much, do you?”

“Uh . . . no sir, not much.”

And then the principal said, “I don’t either.” They laughed together. And then Stephen realized that all the rumors about the principal were untrue. He wasn’t the stern authority figure that other people said he was.

The principal told Steve, “I want you to come down and meet me in my office, and I’ll get you out before the bus leaves so you can get home on time.”  They became friends.

 

You don’t have to know God’s plan for your future in order to get rid of anxiety.  All you really need to know is that your Father cares about you.  And that he’s your friend.

                                                        (copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)

A Misuse of the Imagination

Story of the Day for Tuesday May 24, 2011

A  Misuse of the Imagination

         “Don’t worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow can worry about itself.  Each day has enough troubles of its own.” 

                                                                                   Matthew 6:34

Michael Hodgin tells the story about a woman who was so worried she had an incurable liver condition that she went to see her doctor about it.

The doctor assured her she was okay. “You wouldn’t know if you had this condition,” he explained, “because it causes no discomfort of any kind.”

The woman gasped. “Those are my symptoms exactly!”

There’s a road sign outside my hometown which says, “WORRY IS A MISUSE OF THE IMAGINATION.” We can imagine positive things we can accomplish in the world, or we can imagine all kinds of horrible tragedies that might rain down upon us.

Are you are in the habit of imagining all the things that could possibly go wrong in the future?  If your list of possible nightmares ever reaches an end, it only signifies a lack of creativity of your part – there’s no end to the list of bad things that could conceivably happen to us.

When you find yourself knotted up with anxiety about the future, I think there are some things you need to know. The first is that Jesus doesn’t tell you not to worry because he won’t let bad things happen to you. Bad things will happen to you.

Jesus wants you to know that he’s walking with you through those times, and he’ll give you everything you need. But the things you need can only be found by faith. Worry is a thief. It robs you of the security which is only found in trust.

Worry is a spectacular waste of time. It’s like a rocking chair: there’s a lot of movement, but we don’t go anywhere. Jesus put it this way, “Who of you by worrying can add a single cubit to his height?”

Don’t waste your days imagining what might happen tomorrow. God never lets us live a “tomorrow”; we only get to live “today.”

Sir Wilfred Grenfell is honored with a feast day in the Episcopal Church (October 9) because of his compassionate missionary work among the poor in Labrador, Canada.

In April, 1908, he was rushing on his dogsled to perform surgery for a boy.  Taking a shortcut over an ocean bay, he broke through the ice.  He managed to crawl onto an ice flow, which was heading toward open waters.  Alone along a desolate shoreline, he faced the concerns of the present moment – drying his soaking clothing, unraveling rope to make insulation for his boots, and making a signal flag.

Three days later, he was rescued. His observation captured the wisdom of Jesus’ teaching, “There was nothing to fear. I had done all I could; the rest lay in God’s hands.”

                                                        (copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)