Tag Archives: witness

Where They Found Bread

Story of the Day for Friday October 5, 2012

 

Where They Found Bread

 

                                    Jesus said, . . . “Everything they do is done to impress others.” 

                                                                                                       Matthew 23:5

 

 

When I was in seventh grade, our Science and English teachers were both single, and I think they were flirting.

After Science, we tumbled into Miss Polk’s English class. She noticed someone’s assignment given by Mr. Brinkman, our Science teacher.  Snatching the assignment, she copied it on the blackboard (white boards were black in those days) and we spent the class period parsing it for grammatical flaws. We were all sobered to discover that it was a gravely flawed exhibition of the English language.

Miss Polk encouraged us to hand our revised copy of his assignment to him the next day – which we cheerfully did.

People who know a lot about sub-phyla and nematodes are not easily intimidated, and Mr. Brinkman took our chastisement in good humor. You could tell, however, that he was plotting revenge. He asked us to participate in a science experiment for English class next hour, and we all eagerly complied – because we all coveted a well-rounded education.

 

Mr. Brinkman asked us to engage in an act of civil obedience. He told us to walk into Miss Polk’s class without saying a word. He wanted us to be a model of perfect behavior.

The next hour, we quietly walked into class and took our seats. No talking, no laughing, no gum chewing. We all put our hands on our desks and stared attentively at Miss Polk.

At first, Miss Polk look surprised, but we noticed she was becoming unnerved by our attentiveness. As she started her lesson, and stared at a classroom where every face was focused on her every word, she became increasingly agitated. After five minutes, she waved toward the door and said, “Class dismissed.”

 

A classroom of perfect children is so eerie and unnatural that it soon becomes unbearable. Yet, sometimes, Christians get the impression that the world would be impressed if we acted perfect – as if we were unaffected by grief or temptation.

A plastered pious smile, when inwardly our heart is broken, looks phony — because it is phony. And when we try to hide our imperfections we look like a bald man whose toupee is sitting on his head sideways.

 

The world isn’t looking for us to be perfect; they’re looking for us to be honest. They’re not impressed with someone who claims that they’re never hungry, but they are intrigued by anyone who simply tells them where they found bread.

(copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)

Where They Found Bread

Story of the Day for Monday July 25, 2011

 

Where They Found Bread

 

                                     Jesus said, . . . “Everything they do is done to impress others.”

 

                                                                                               Matthew 23:5      

When I was in seventh grade, our Science and English teachers were both single, and I think they were flirting.

 

After Science, we tumbled into Miss Polk’s English class. She noticed someone’s assignment given by Mr. Brinkman, our Science teacher.  Snatching the assignment, she copied it on the blackboard (white boards were black in those days) and we spent the class period parsing it for grammatical flaws. We were all sobered to discover that it was a gravely flawed exhibition of the English language.

 

Miss Polk encouraged us to hand our revised copy of his assignment to him the next day – which we cheerfully did.

 

People who know a lot about sub-phyla and nematodes are not easily intimidated, and Mr. Brinkman took our chastisement in good humor. You could tell, however, that he was plotting revenge. He asked us to participate in a science experiment for English class next hour, and we all eagerly complied – because we all coveted a well-rounded education.

 

 Mr. Brinkman asked us to engage in an act of civil obedience. He told us to walk into Miss Polk’s class without saying a word. He wanted us to be a model of perfect behavior.

 

The next hour, we quietly walked into class and took our seats. No talking, no laughing, no gum chewing. We all put our hands on our desks and stared attentively at Miss Polk.

 

At first, Miss Polk look surprised, but we noticed she was becoming unnerved by our attentiveness. As she started her lesson, and stared at a classroom where every face was focused on her every word, she became increasingly agitated. After five minutes, she waved toward the door and said, “Class dismissed.”

 

A classroom of perfect children is so eerie and unnatural that it soon becomes unbearable. Yet, sometimes, Christians get the impression that the world would be impressed if we acted perfect – as if we were unaffected by grief or temptation.

 

A plastered pious smile, when inwardly our heart is broken, looks phony — because it is phony. And when we try to hide our imperfections we look like a bald man whose toupee is sitting on his head sideways.

 

The world isn’t looking for us to be perfect; they’re looking for us to be honest. They’re not impressed with someone who claims that they’re never hungry, but they are intrigued by anyone who simply tells them where they found bread. 

 

                                                               (copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre

 

 

Walk on Water and Doubt

Story of the Day for Wednesday May 25, 2011

Walk on Water and Doubt 

                    Live such good lives among the pagans that. . . they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day he visits us.  

                                                                                  1 Peter 2:12

Paul Mason is writing a book on losing weight.  He has lost some pounds of late and is eager to share his insights with others.  Yet, what makes us admire his chutzpah is that, at 686 pounds, Paul Mason is still considered the heaviest man in the world. He grew so enormous that, to get him to a hospital, firemen had to knock down a wall of his house and lift him out with a forklift.

We wish him well – both on his book and his diet.  (One witty journalist thinks his book will be a “vest-sweller”). But you do have to wonder, don’t you — who would buy a diet book from the fattest man on earth?

The apostle Peter talks about our lives being a creditable reflection of our faith.  He believes that our behavior serves as a witness to unbelievers and helps lead them to the God of grace.

So, do you wince when annoying busybodies like me talk about being a witness for Christ?  More often than not, this topic dredges up painful memories.  We recall some of our spectacular failures to live a Christ-like life, and know, sometimes, we’re not a good witness at all.

If you’re feeling pretty cruddy about how you’ve behaved lately, maybe you need to remember Peter.  He pledged his loyalty to his Lord and declared he was willing to die rather than disown Jesus. Hours later, he vehemently denied any knowledge or allegiance to Jesus.  Not once, but three times.

Peter knows what it is like to fail the Lord.  And, unlike your failures or mine, Peter’s sin got stuck in the Bible for the whole world to see.

Are you embarrassed because you have fallen flat on your face?  Well, this is not the time to talk about being a witness.   We first must go to the one who covers our shame.  Jesus didn’t come into the world to pat good people on the head; he came as a doctor to care for our spiritual sickness.  Only Jesus’ forgiveness can get us back on our feet again.

Look at Peter’s life.  He tried to walk on water and doubted.  Jesus grabs his hand and lifts him up.  Peter gave the misguided advice that Jesus would never need to suffer and die.  Jesus called him Satan. But he kept him as his disciple.  And, around a campfire on the shore of Galilee, the risen Lord confronted Peter after his denial, and restored him to a place of leadership.

We are not fooling unbelievers when we try to deny our failures and hypocrisy.  Our witness to the world will sometimes be the wonder of Christ’s mercy when we fail.

But the real goal is still that the world would observe us rising from the ashes and — even though fuzzy at the edges — they would see a reflection of the goodness of our Lord. It’s never too late to be a positive witness for Christ.  Just ask Peter.
                                                          (copyright by climbinghigher.org and by Marty Kaarre)